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What are your favourite books?

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Postby Arctangent » Mon Jun 11, 2007 3:48 pm

i love lord of the rings, the dragonbone chair series by tad williams, david eddings belgariad books and also dune, dune messiah and children of dune... they got a bit ropey and hard to read after that.
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Postby lunanen » Tue Jun 12, 2007 1:55 pm

VoiceOfCommonSense wrote:
Nice topic! I'm defending it on 3rd of July - so it's like 3 weeks left :D There's a lot of reading for me to do before that date, but I hope it's all gonna be fine :)

Basically, we are really free to write about anything, so that's why some of the topics in my University seems so 'underground' :) There's a friend of mine who writes about the sexuality of angels in English Literature, another one chose to elaborate upon Alchemy in faust and stuff like this, so it's really a lot of good stuff to read... Pity I'm not a professor :)

Oh and btw, I enjoy occasional Dickens, too :D


best of luck at the defence!!! That's really great that you could choose any topic. Most of our profs gave a list to choose from. I was lucky enough to have a supervisor who was ready to read and explore any topic. My work was based on Dickens' the Pickwick Papers...it's was fun anyway. :) However, i had significant problems with the literature as well....all books on Cockney that i found were dated minimum 1978...and all written by Russian linguists... had to order from UK...at least something. eh...the hard lot of a linguist...heh %)
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Postby Vicissitudo » Tue Jun 12, 2007 2:15 pm

My list would be something like:

Louis De Bernieres - Senor Vivo and the Coca Lord
Tom Sharpe - Wilt
Gabriel Garcia Marquez - Of Love and Other Demons
George Orwell - 1984
Hunter S. Thompson - Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
Truman Capote - In Cold Blood
Stephen King (writing as Richard Bachman) - The Running Man

There are lots more but they're probably my favourites.
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Postby Aylin Black » Tue Jun 12, 2007 3:15 pm

@VoiceOfCommonSense... hey... that songs very interesting. Good luck. I'd also love to read what you wrote about the subject.
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Postby Sear » Tue Jun 12, 2007 8:42 pm

lunanen wrote:
Sear wrote:heh...it was about time that such a topic would appear on this forum!
Favorite books....well...there are quite a few, and actually, now, i can't remember them all!
But i'll start with some that changed my perspective of life in general: "Crime and Punishment" by Dostoievski, closely fallowed by "Demons".It's been almost 2 years since i last read them...but the last one troubles me even now....I really consider Dostoieski as a genius.
....and the list will continue...
P.S.: i love reading gothic literature...starting with Horace Walpole....finishing with Anne Rice...


Now that is something I could never understand....Ok, well, Crime and Punishment is more or less tolerable in my opinion, but say Brothers Karamazoff....uff...I quit after 50 pages....if not sooner. Just wondering...did you read the original or a translation? And of course, it's all a matter of taste, probably...
The translation, unfortunetly i do not know any russian...
My first Dostoievski book was Crime and Punishment, and to tell you the truth, it took a while for me to get ''sucked in'' by the story...and now i might add i don't regret continuing the reading....
Brothers Karamazoff kind of bored me as well, but I kept on reading it, it is interesting, has some memorable parts....especially the conversation between Ivan and ''the devil''....
But still...my favorite book remains "Demons"....it's a masterpiece and if you haven't read it 'till now i warmly recommend it to you....

oh well...i have to add another great book to my list: Jean Paul Sartre- Nausea
( bah..i do tend to like existentialists)...
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Postby lunanen » Tue Jun 12, 2007 10:39 pm

Sear wrote:The translation, unfortunetly i do not know any russian...
My first Dostoievski book was Crime and Punishment, and to tell you the truth, it took a while for me to get ''sucked in'' by the story...and now i might add i don't regret continuing the reading....
Brothers Karamazoff kind of bored me as well, but I kept on reading it, it is interesting, has some memorable parts....especially the conversation between Ivan and ''the devil''....
But still...my favorite book remains "Demons"....it's a masterpiece and if you haven't read it 'till now i warmly recommend it to you....

oh well...i have to add another great book to my list: Jean Paul Sartre- Nausea
( bah..i do tend to like existentialists)...


It's just you are not the first one...foreigner I mean who really enjoys C&P and The Brothers Karamazov and i just thought that maybe the translation does the trick. His works are considered hard for understanding, and in my opinion they are...of course I've read Crime and Punishment...and I must confess it was the severest punishment for me :D However, The Insulted and Humiliated is simply superb! I sometimes wonder how could one person write 2 books so completely different!
I'll check out Demons though...I'll try to at least :)
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Postby Warspirit » Wed Jun 13, 2007 8:44 pm

Sear wrote:
Warspirit wrote:I mostly read historical books. Love the ones which are about WW2 with alot of division names and numbers everywhere :P
Also books which are about the crusades, antiquity and roman empire are fun to read. Always interesting to know about what happend in the past :D
...reminds me of Maurice Druon's Les Rois Maudits( The Accursed kings)....amazing book....


Hmm, never heard of, I shall see if I can find a swedish version :D
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Postby psychosomatiKing » Fri Jun 15, 2007 12:40 am

This is hard... but my list would go something like this:

1. Otherland by Tad Williams. Completely original work of sci-fi, and even though it's over 4k pages you always have that "this is so good I cant stop reading"-feeling all the way through.

2. The Sandman by Neil Gaiman. By definition not really a book, but a comic-book. Changed my view on comics forever. It has more depth, stronger character portaits and a richer story than anything else I've ever read. You can read it over and over again and still find little details you didnt notice before.

3. Lord of the Rings by JRR Tolkien. My introduction to fantasy and the book that triggered my love of story. I read it three times before I devoured the rest of his books twice.

4. The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. Ever read a book that makes you giggle so hard that people give you strange looks as they pass you by? Absolutely brilliant comedy... with a hint of sadness.

5. And the Ass Saw the Angel by Nick Cave. Very difficult to read as the entire book is written in spoken language with a heavy dialect... but it is so beautiful and ultimately so rewarding when the story grips you... with both madness and poetic rage.

That'll do for now... of course there are more. Neil Gaiman for instance has yet to write something that I dont like. I dont think he can.
And there is a bunch of classics that bring me fond memories. But none so mindblowing as these five mentioned above.

Cheers
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Postby Larth » Fri Jun 15, 2007 2:32 pm

Frederick Forsyth - "The Day of The Jackal"

Andrew Jennings - "Foul!"

Antony Beevor - "Stalingrad"
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Postby DarkLink » Sat Jun 16, 2007 1:02 am

I love The witches trilogy by Anne rice as well as The Vampire Chronicles:
Interview with the Vampire (1976)
The Vampire Lestat (1985)
The Queen of the Damned (1988)

ANd I love "the Picture of Dorian Gray" by Wilde
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Postby Storm » Sun Jun 17, 2007 12:56 pm

Les Ténèbres wrote:Yeah, seriously. Ibsen is overrated by far, sure. Well, I've only read Sult and Pan, but I really like those.
As for Pan(have you read it?), Hamsun describes all the actions how the main character experience them. In the epilog another person describes the main character, and because of that one understands why he acts like he does - in some way.

And some of the point in Hamsuns writings may be that some folk do irrational things - when for instance in love, or in great need.


I've read Pan with my class, actually. And I can't say I was overwhelmed, though I see why you like it. His main character does a lot of irrational things, yes, but we don't really get to know why (although we understand that he does it because he faces difficult situtations). And so most people thinks that he's weird - he's doing things that seems "wrong" or strange (because he's in love), and then people coucludes "He is doing irrational things, therefore, it must be because of some fault within his character". But Hamsun's point is, in my opinion, that no one is actually weird, or strange, but in certain situations people do things they wouldn't normally do, things that is against the normal rules for social behaviour. And I don't think he shows that all too well, because the way he writes it, it might as well just seem like the main character is one of those stereotypical strange guys, someone that is special and different from other people.
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Postby Warspirit » Sun Jun 17, 2007 6:22 pm

Read a really good book on the train to Gothenburg, "A Drink Before The War" by Dennis Lehane. It was so funny, about 2 private detectives and a gang war. Easily one of the best thrillers(?) I've read.
Also "Patient 67" and "Gone, Baby, Gone" by him can I really recommend.
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Postby 34.788 » Thu Jun 28, 2007 10:38 am

I read much in the past but I dont read generally anymore ,but I like scientific and sci fi .
my favs are ;

- Black Hole
- Quantum Physics -illusion or reality / Alastair
- A Mathematician s Apology / Hardy
- The Wild Numbers
- The Man Who Loved Only Numbers
- Relativity
- An introduction into Metaphysics
- The Art of Mathematics
- Recollections of A Dead House / Dostoyevski
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Postby Sympathy » Thu Jun 28, 2007 10:48 am

A Clockwork Orange - Burgess
Faust - Goethe
Flowers for Algernon - Daniel Keyes
Thus spoke Zarathustra - Nietzsche
Suffer The Children - John Saul
Of Mice And Men - John Steinbeck
Lolita - Bulgakov
Interview with the vampire - Anne Rice
Creature - John Saul
The Unloved - John Saul
Animal Farm - G Orwell



and I'll be back soon :D
I'm the one who laughs for last and laughs forever more!
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Postby Sear » Thu Jun 28, 2007 2:32 pm

Sympathy wrote:A Clockwork Orange - Burgess
Faust - Goethe
Flowers for Algernon - Daniel Keyes
Thus spoke Zarathustra - Nietzsche
Suffer The Children - John Saul
Of Mice And Men - John Steinbeck
Lolita - Bulgakov
Interview with the vampire - Anne Rice
Creature - John Saul
The Unloved - John Saul
Animal Farm - G Orwell



and I'll be back soon :D
OMG....you reminded me of Saul....God...hes books just gave me the creeps...
I remember that after reading The Unloved and Second Child i couldn't sleep for a couple of nights( for each of them)...and at night fall i kept them far away from my room (that was the level of the horror I had!!!)
The Blackstone Chronicles.....amazing book....Dreadfully amazing....
" No symphony in mind to color my dreams..."
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